Wage, Benefits, and Break Laws in California

As an employee, you spend almost half of your waking life at work, making your physical, mental, and emotional health heavily dependent on your working conditions. Due to this enormous effect that a workplace or employer can have on an employee’s life, the state offers numerous protections to make sure that every employee is treated fairly by their employers according to a minimum standard. Any employee can take the help of an Employment law attorney in Los Angeles if they feel that their rights are not being upheld, and get restitution as a result. This ensures that the workforce is happy, healthy, and productive.

But how can employees know what their rights are? While employers are required to keep their employees informed of their rights, it is often in their best interest to do the minimum possible to meet that standard. So, this article, compiled with advice from the best employment lawyers in Los Angeles, seeks to inform you of the important stuff, relating to

  • Wage Law
  • Overtime
  • Rest Breaks
  • Payments

So read on, and learn more.

Minimum Wage: Depending on the size of the employer, the minimum wage in California is the absolute lowest hourly rate that an employee can legally be paid. It is illegal to pay anyone less than this hourly rate, and an employment attorney in Los Angeles will be able to help you take action against a company that may violate minimum wage laws.

Overtime: The law in California dictates that all hours above 40 workweek, or eight hours a workday must be paid overtime. This is to prevent an employer from overworking an employee. From 8-12 hours in a standard workday, overtime is paid at a time and a half, and double rate beyond 12 hours.

In California, the minimum wage is $12/hr. for a company with less than 25 employees, and $13/hr. for companies with more.

Breaks: A number of breaks are mandated by law to make sure that employees get the rest they need.

      • Rest Breaks: A paid, 10-minute break is necessary for each four-hour work period. If a break is not permitted, the worker is entitled to one hour of extra pay.
      • Meal breaks: A paid 30-minute break is mandated if the employee works more than five hours a day, with another being necessary if they work more than ten hours.
      • Breastfeeding breaks: In addition to well-known provisions like maternity leave, the state affords mothers extra rights. Employers must provide time to employees who desire to breastfeed their children any time the mother needs to. They must also be provided with a private, safe location.

Payment of wages: The law In California mandates that all paydays must be designated in advance, with a frequency of at least twice a month.

As always, if you suspect your employer has violated any of these protections, you can visit an employment lawyer in Los Angeles who can help you proceed further.

Contact Kirakosian Law today!

These blogs are meant purely for educational purposes. They contain only general information about legal matters. They are not legal advice, and should not be treated as such. If you have any specific questions about any legal matter you should consult with an attorney.

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